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Tracking Events Without a Confirmation Page

When there is an on-click event that you wish to track (e.g. a contact form submission) but you don’t have a confirmation page to use when setting up your goals, you can still track conversions. To do that, you’ll use Google Analytics’ event tracking scripts. They are easy to set up and give you the flexibility to track almost any “event” on your site that requires a click.

Step 1: What type of on-click event would you like to track?

CONTACT FORM

To track a contact form submission that doesn’t have a confirmation page, we’ll need to set up an event in Google Analytics.

Please fill in the following details:

Category (The name you supply for the group of objects you want to track. We recommend using something like “Contact”):

Action (Used to define the type of user interaction. We recommend using something like “Information Request” or “Support Request”):

Label (Optional. Recommend using “Contact Form” or use this when you need to distinguish between contact forms [if you have more than one you need to track]):

Value (Optional. If you’d like to assign a numeric value to your lead, enter that value here):

Non-Interaction (Optional. Select “true” if you want to consider it a bounce when a visitor views one page, submits a contact form and leaves without viewing any other pages.)

Place the following code within the code of your submission link:

It should look something like this for your Contact Form:

LIVE CHAT

To track the number of live chats initiated on your website, we’ll need to set up an event in Google analytics.

Please fill in the following details:

Category (The name you supply for the group of objects you want to track. We recommend using something like “Live Chat”):

Action (Used to define the type of user interaction. We recommend using something like “Live Chat Request” or “Chat Request”):

Label (Optional. Recommend using “Homepage Chat” or use this when you need to distinguish between live chat locations on your website [if you have more than one you need to track]):

Value (Optional. If you’d like to assign a numeric value to your chat, enter that value here):

Non-Interaction (Optional. Select “true” if you want to consider it a bounce when a visitor views one page, submits a contact form and leaves without viewing any other pages.)

Place the following code within the code of your Live Chat link:

It should look something like this for your Live Chat:

SOCIAL MEDIA FOLLOW / SHARE / LIKE

Ever wonder how many people are adding you to Google+, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter or some other social network? Or how about which specific blog posts get shared the most on social networks? With event tracking in Google Analytics we can keep track of all of that information, but first you need to set it up properly. Keep in mind, Google Analytics is building out its social analytics section and already has some great +1 data in there.

Please fill in the following details:

Category (The name you supply for the group of objects you want to track. We recommend using something like “Social Media ”):

Action (Used to define the type of user interaction. We recommend using the name of the social media network associated with the event [for example, “Twitter” or “Facebook”]).

Label (Optional. Recommend using something like “tweet” or “follow” or “like”).

Value (Optional. If you’d like to assign a numeric value to your social add, enter that value here):

Non-Interaction (Optional. Select “true” if you want to consider it a bounce when a visitor views one page, submits a contact form and leaves without viewing any other pages.)

Place the following code within the code of your social media link:

It should look something like this for your social media button:

FILE DOWNLOAD

Have a whitepaper or some other file available for download on your site? With event tracking in Google Analytics you can track the number of times a particular file has been downloaded.

Please fill in the following details:

Category (The name you supply for the group of objects you want to track. We recommend using something like “download”):

Action (Used to define the type of user interaction. We recommend using something like “whitepaper”):

Label (Optional. Recommend using something to describe the subject matter or file name of the downloaded file):

Value (Optional. If you’d like to assign a numeric value to your file download, enter that value here):

Non-Interaction (Optional. Select “true” if you want to consider it a bounce when a visitor views one page, submits a contact form and leaves without viewing any other pages.)

Place the following code within the code of your download link:

It should look something like this for your download link:

RSS SUBSCRIPTION/NEWSLETTER SIGNUP

Ever wish you could easily track how many people have subscribed to your RSS feed without having to log in to a service like Feedburner? You can actually tag your RSS Subscription links in Google Analytics to count any click on your subscribe button as an event. Then you’ll be able to easily measure which blog posts lead to the most subscriptions.

Please fill in the following details:

Category (The name you supply for the group of objects you want to track. We recommend using something like “subscribe”):

Action (Used to define the type of user interaction. We recommend using something like “rss” or “email”):

Label (Optional. Recommend using something to describe the location of the subscription link (e.g. “Sidebar”)):

Value (Optional. If you’d like to assign a numeric value to your subscription, enter that value here):

Non-Interaction (Optional. Select “true” if you want to consider it a bounce when a visitor views one page, submits a contact form and leaves without viewing any other pages.)

Place the following code within the code of your subscription link:

It should look something like this for your subscribe button:

USER REGISTRATION

Does your website require visitors to register for something (like to register in order to comment on your blog or for an upcoming event)? If you don’t have a confirmation page after a user successfully signs up, you may not be tracking those goal completions in Google Analytics. In order to do so, you need to set up event tracking.

Please fill in the following details:

Category (The name you supply for the group of objects you want to track. We recommend using something like “registration”):

Action (Used to define the type of user registration. We recommend using something like “blog”):

Label (Optional. Recommend using something to further describe what the user is registering for.):

Value (Optional. If you’d like to assign a numeric value to your registration, enter that value here):

Non-Interaction (Optional. Select “true” if you want to consider it a bounce when a visitor views one page, submits a contact form and leaves without viewing any other pages.)

Place the following code within the code of your registration link:

It should look something like this for your registration button:

AFFILIATE LINKS

If you have affiliate links on your website, you may want to consider a click on those links as a goal completion. Because a click on those links would result in the visitor leaving your site, you’ll need to set up event tracking on any affiliate links you wish to track as goals.

Please fill in the following details:

Category (The name you supply for the group of objects you want to track. We recommend using something like “affiliate link”):

Action (Used to define the type of affiliate link. We recommend using something like “Netflix”):

Label (Optional. We recommend using something to further describe the affiliate link (e.g. “Free Trial”).):

Value (Optional. If you’d like to assign a numeric value to your affiliate link, enter that value here):

Non-Interaction (Optional. Select “true” if you want to consider it a bounce when a visitor views one page, submits a contact form and leaves without viewing any other pages.)

Place the following code within the code of your affiliate link:

It should look something like this for your affiliate link:

BLOG COMMENTS

Ever wonder which posts received the most blog comments? Wish you could easily tell without mining through your archives? Using event tracking in Google Analytics we can set up blog comments as a goal in Google Analytics.

Please fill in the following details:

Category (The name you supply for the group of objects you want to track. We recommend using something like “blog”):

Action (Used to define the type of event. We recommend using something like “comment”):

Label (Optional. Not recommended for this type of event.):

Value (Optional. If you’d like to assign a numeric value to your blog comment, enter that value here):

Non-Interaction (Optional. Select “true” if you want to consider it a bounce when a visitor views one page, submits a contact form and leaves without viewing any other pages.)

Place the following code within the code of your blog comment submit button:

It should look something like this for your comment button:

PRODUCT/ARTICLE RATING

If you give visitors the ability to rate your products or content, you can easily set up an event to track just how often they are being rated.

Please fill in the following details:

Category (The name you supply for the group of objects you want to track. We recommend using something like “blog post” or “product”):

Action (Used to define the type of event. We recommend using something like “4 stars” or “like”):

Label (Optional. You can use this to specify the product or article being rated.):

Value (Optional. If you’d like to assign a numeric value to your rating, enter that value here):

Non-Interaction (Optional. Select “true” if you want to consider it a bounce when a visitor views one page, submits a contact form and leaves without viewing any other pages.)

Place the following code within the code of your rating button:

It should look something like this for your rating button:

VIDEO

If you have videos on your site, you may want to know how your visitors are interacting with them. How many visitors played the video? How many watch until the end? Do people who watch the video convert more often than those that don’t? By implementing event tracking on your videos you can answer these questions.

There are many options for embedding video on your page, and how you implement event tracking depends on which option you use.

YouTube Videos Embedded On Your Site:
Although this is possible, it involves customizing a JavaScript file. For more details, see Tracking YouTube Videos in Google Analytics.

Standard Flash Video Player:
Although this is possible, it involves working with the Flash source file (.swf) and editing the ActionScript. For more details, see Google Analytics Tracking for Adobe Flash.

FlowPlayer:
FlowPlayer is an open-source Flash video player – you supply the video file and it handles the playback and viewing functionality. It is free and has a plugin that does the event tracking for you.

See the details for setting up the Google Analytics plugin on the FlowPlayer site for information configuring event tracking for your videos.

HTML5 Video:
Although this is possible, it involves customizing a JavaScript file. See the following resources for more details:
Tracking HTML5 with Google Analytics
HTML5 Demo: Tracking Video Progress with Google Analytics

GENERAL EVENT

You can create events around any type of link. If there is an event that you didn’t see listed above (such as an account login), you can create that event here. Just fill out the form below and add the event tracking script to your link where indicated. You can also send us feedback if this is a common event you setup and would like to see added to GA Config.

Please fill in the following details:

Category (The name you supply for the group of objects you want to track. We recommend using something like “Login”):

Action (Used to define the type of user interaction. We recommend using something like “Account Login”):

Label (Optional. We recommend using something to further describe the user interaction (e.g. “Clicked”).):

Value (Optional. If you’d like to assign a numeric value to your user interaction, enter that value here):

Non-Interaction (Optional. Select “true” if you want to consider it a bounce when a visitor views one page, submits a contact form and leaves without viewing any other pages.)

Place the following code within the code of your link:

It should look something like this for your link:

Now that we have our event tracking script in place, we now need to set up the event as a goal in Google Analytics.

1. Open up the profile you wish to set up the goal in.
2. Click the gear icon in the upper right corner of the Google Analytics interface.
3. Click the Goals tab (in the sub-navigation just below where your Profile is listed)
4. Choose the Goal Set you wish to add the event to.
5. Name your goal and select the Event radio button.
6. Populate the following goal details:

Category | that matches |
Action | that matches |
Label | that matches |
Value | that matches |

7. If you’ve added a Value in step 1, leave the “Use the actual Event Value” radio button selected.

8. Click “Save” and you’re ready to go!

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